DID YOU REALLY THINK YOU’D FIND A PROFILE ON “FAMOUS” PEOPLE KNOWN FOR BEING HUMBLE AND NON-FAMOUS? C’MON, SERIOUSLY? YOU’RE OBVIOUSLY NOT THE SMARTEST INDIVIDUAL, BUT ASSUMING YOU KNOW HOW TO READ, WE’VE INCLUDED A BRIEF, INCOMPLETE, AND OCCASIONALLY ACCURATE DESCRIPTION OF
THE BELOVED HOME OF YOUR BEAUTIFUL HAMMOCK.

Home to more volcanoes and less people than any other country in Central America, Nicaragua is chaotic place to relax.

Though Nicaraguans first earned their independence from Spain in 1821, they have spent much of the following two centuries either under the oppression of foreign influence and dictatorship or amidst violent civil war and revolution.

Despite this political turbulence, or perhaps because of it, they have developed an especially vibrant culture, excelling in baseball, literature, and of course, in weaving the best hammocks in the world. Their most famous figure, Ruben Dario, was an artistic genius who began reading at the age of three and is widely regarded as the greatest poet in the Spanish speaking world.

In addition to their love for literature, Nicaraguans, like all Latin Americans, are family oriented and extremely festive. From piñatas and fireworks for birthdays, to dressing up and dancing in the streets during one of the countless Patron Saint festivals, Nicaraguans are generally eager to seek out any occasion to be with families and friends dancing and enjoying life.

Nicaragua is described as “The Land of Lakes and Volcanoes,” and it has plenty of both. Most impressive of all their landmarks, perhaps, is Isla de Ometepe, an island made up of two volcanoes in the middle of the massive Lake Nicaragua. Ometepe is the largest volcanic lake island in the world. Lake Nicaragua, for its part, is home to 365 islands and some of the only freshwater sharks in the world.

In between the lakes and volcanoes are large fertile plains on the pacific coast, tropical rain forests on the eastern Caribbean coast, and verdant, cloud forest highlands in the center. The climate and landscape contribute to their largely agricultural economy. Though well known for their coffee, their cigars, especially those from the mountain region of Estelí, are widely regarded as some of the finest in the world.

Despite a beautiful landscape and vibrant, proud cultural heritage, the effects of centuries of revolution and oppression have taken their toll. Nicaragua remains a country divided, and their economy continues to suffer. Currently the second poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, an average Nicaraguan “Campesino” can expect to make less than five dollars a day.

Note: In return for the elaborate craftsmanship and pride with which our weavers make our hammocks, we always pay fair wages. In addition, 10% of all profits from our “El Campesino” hammock are donated back to Nicaraguan charities to help better the lives of their struggling citizens.